EMP Update version 4

THURSDAY, MARCH 10, 2005
SUPER-SERVICE, 1943
A super service-station of tomorrow: Automobiles will be serviced on the ground floor—helicopters on the roof. After Victory, the Bohn organization will turn its attention to a wide variety of new developments like the one above . . .

Artwork by George W. Walker, who would go on to become styling chief and vice president of Ford Motor Co. Lettering above the service bays reads: REPAIR, WASH, LUBE.

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 9, 2005
New World for Sale
SOMEWHERE . . . closer than you think . . . there’s
a bright new world awaiting you . . . with a wind that’s soft
and nights that are like friendly velvet robes. And there’s
a thrilling car to whisk you in ease and comfort to this land
of warmth and sunshine . . . give you the smoothest
fun-flight to summertime you’ve ever known. It’s that
exciting new traveler, that sleek, flashing thoroughbred
. . . the 1941 Lincoln-Zephyr!

MONDAY, MARCH 7, 2005
1965 Scrabblemobile
Your air conditioner, television and other appliances are just the beginning of a new electric age. Your food will cook in seconds instead of hours. Electricity will close your windows at the first drop of rain. Lamps will cut on and off automatically to fit the lighting needs in your rooms. Television “screens” will hang on the wall. By 1965, you will need and have much more electricity than you have today . . .

SUNDAY, MARCH 6, 2005
The Archive
Housekeeping update: Posts for the current and previous month will be on this page; anything older than that gets trundled off to the EphemeraNow Archive. Links to which can be found at the top and bottom of the page. Please, no food or drink in the Archive, and no loud talking.

SATURDAY, MARCH 5, 2005
The Sweethearts’ Pal
From a 1953 sampler of calendar proofs comes this uncharacteristically chaste illustration by pinup artist
Art Frahm, who was a pioneering investigator into the
effects of celery and gravity on waistband elastic.

THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 2005
TV in the Trees, 1962
The first large-screen portable TV you don’t have to plug in. (It’s all transistor—no tubes.) This portable television really earns the right to be called portable. An amazing rechargeable Energy Cell makes it independent of electric outlets. That’s why it’s right at home in the modern tree terrace illustrated.

Vibrasonic
An unusual word you should understand before buying a stereo hi-fi. Most of the sounds from a stereo do not go directly from the loudspeakers to your ears. The notes are “bounced” off walls, ceiling and floor. So what you hear is actually what engineers call reflected sound energy. This is why it’s important for you to know about Vibrasonic. It is a special sound system you will find only in Motorola stereo hi-fi. No matter what the acoustics of your room, a twist of the Vibrasonic dial and you can be sure of hearing music rich in tone, exactly as it was played . . .

Herman Miller Time
From 1961, another in the series of architectural fantasies painted by Charles Schridde (who also illustrated the 1959 Imperial brochure) for Motorola’s “Lively Art of Electronics” campaign. To the left are a pair of George Nelson “coconut” chairs, designed for the Herman Miller furniture company in 1955. They retail nowadays for $3495. Gulp.